Tag Archives: Tannhauser

Tannhauser Revisited

My brother Paul, of blessed memory, hated Tannhäuser.  He said there was “too much Jesus in it.”  I haven’t seen it since th 2012 Bayreuth production (since mercifully withdrawn) and I was happy to have another look during the recent Met revival of the boring and pretty Otto Schenck production. Tannhäuser is the second of the three […]

The Met Historic Collection

Halfway through the collection of “Legendary Performances” released by the Met this year, several surprises came to the fore. One was how poor the chorus at the Met was in the 1940s and 1950s.  It was as if they dragged folks in from the street to have a go at the Pilgrim’s Chorus.  Apparently the […]

Bayreuth Tannhauser

In a perceptive (if wordy and miserably edited) article in the program for this summer’s Bayreuth Tännhauser, Edward A. Bortnichak and Paula M. Bortnichak explain the intellectual basis of Sebastian Baumgarten’s production.  It has to do with “bioethics,” or how technological progress may have an adverse influence on traditional (i.e., romantic) notions of human sensibilities, morality, and “rights.”