Tag Archives: Parsifal

Vienna’s New Parsifal

Classic dramatic structure requires that a play feature a climax—a single moment in the action, necessary to the narrative, when the protagonist achieves self-awareness, accepts fate, and performs the action that the plot requires.  In Hamlet, it is the moment that prompts his declaration “The point envenomed too?  Then, venom, do thy work,” and fatally […]

Parsifal and Wagner’s Theology

After just an unconscionably long time, I have finally got to page 319 of Richard H. Bell’s fine study, Wagner’s Parsifal: An Appreciation in the Light of His Theological Journey.  I am very grateful to Mr. Bell for his discipline and erudition, and for shedding light on both the splendid final work of this master […]

Francois Girard’s Parsifal at the Met

Readers of this blog will know that the broad condemnations of Peter Gelb’s leadership at the Metropolitan Opera seem to me like warnings of falling asteroids — they simply don’t conform to my personal experience.  And the just-closed run of Parsifal is in keeping with this record.  It was impeccably cast, ravishingly played, movingly conducted, thrillingly […]

Parsifal with the Laughs

The gifted actress Katarina Dalayman took time off from her performing, teaching, coaching and all of her other responsibilities to join the “Singers Roundtable” at the Wagner Society’s seminar on Sunday.  We were discussing Kundry when she made the following very interesting points (my summary, not hers): Here we have someone who, for her sin, is condemned […]