Tag Archives: Die Meistersinger

Meistersinger: Sachs and Grimes

It’s one thing to impose an external “konzept” onto a dramatic work and shove the piece unwillingly through it.  American audiences refer to the results as “Eurotrash,” and I would choose the recent, unlamented Bayreuth production of Tannhäuser – staging the work as a divertissement for the workers of a biogas factory in order to investigate […]

Die Meistersinger: Sons-in-Law

The knight Walther is too often experienced by the audience through Eva’s eyes – handsome, strong, rebellious within acceptable boundaries, virile, dashing, a born artist and a hell of a tenor.  A recent performance of avid McVicar’s insightful Gyndebourne/Chicago/San Francisco production, and a careful listen to the Reginald Goodall English-language recording, suggests that the truth […]

Die Meistersinger: Dreams

About ten years ago, during a road trip through South Carolina, a dear friend from England began talking to me about a dream he’d had.  Oh stop, I implored.  Please don’t even start this.  Dreams are by their nature indescribable.  They are subliminal events, fruit of the id, and any attempt to render them into […]

Meistersinger at the Met

In December I had the chance to attend two performances and a dress rehearsal of the Metropolitan Opera’s production of Die Meistersinger, and felt (as I so often do) mystified to be blessed so plentifully.  The last time I had attended Meistersinger was March 2007, when I saw this production.  I had watched some DVD […]